HeartDhamma

AN IV 170 In Harmony

Yuganaddha Sutta [1]

 

This I have heard,

On one occasion, the venerable Ānanda lived near Kosambi

 in Ghosita’s Hermitage.

Then he addresses the monks saying:

 

“Monks”

“Friend” they replied. He said this:

 

“Whenever friends, a monk or a nun comes to me

 and declares the attainment of full awakening,

all do so by either one of these four possible ways.” [2]

 

What four?

 

(1) Some monk or nun develops calmness of mind first,

then discernment. [3]

 

By doing so, the path comes alive within them. [4]

They follow that path, develop it

and practice it continuously.

 

As they do so, the fetters wear away

and they become rid of mental inclinations. [5]

 

(2) Some monk or nun develops discernment first,

 then calmness of mind.

 

By doing so, the path comes alive within them.

They follow that path, develop it

and practice it continuously.

 

As they do so, the fetters wear away

and they become rid of mental inclinations.

 

(3) Some monk or nun develops both calmness of mind

and discernment, in harmony. [6]

 

By doing so, the path comes alive within them.

They follow that path, develop it

and practice it continuously.

 

As they do so, the fetters wear away

and they become rid of mental inclinations.

 

(4) Some monk or nun’s mind is overwhelmed

by restlessness to know teaching. [7]

 

There comes a time when their mind settles down inwardly, [8]

it comes to rest,

unified and composed. [9]

The path comes alive within them.

They follow that path, develop it

and practice it continuously.

 

As they do so, the fetters wear away

and they become rid of mental inclinations.

 

“Whenever friends, a monk or a nun come to me

and declare the attainment of full awakening,

all do so by either one of these four possible ways.”

 

[1] This discourse from the venerable Ānanda seems to imply that the situation took place after the Buddha’s parinibbāna. Therefore, possibly from a later date. Some clues in the discourse’s structure, like the missing repetition after each of the four ‘ways,’ seem to imply this also. And a rare explanation of the concepts of samatha and vipassanā, done by Ānanda, not by the Buddha. Although the sutta seems to be quite in line with the Dhamma.

[2]mama santike arahattappattiṁ byākaroti, sabbo so catūhi maggehi, etesaṁ vā aññatarena.  

[3]samathapubbaṅgamaṁ vipassanaṁ bhāveti

[4]maggo sañjāyati

[5]saṁyojanāni pahīyanti, anusayā byantīhonti.

[6]samathavipassanaṁ yuganaddhaṁ bhāveti

[7]dhammuddhaccaviggahitaṁ mānasaṁ hoti.

[8] Some of the Pāḷi structure even seems to corroborate a later edition of this sutta.

[9]Hoti so, āvuso, samayo yaṁ taṁ cittaṁ ajjhattameva santiṭṭhati sannisīdati ekodi hoti samādhiyati.

 

This is a gift of Dhamma

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